Three Act Plot

Screen Shot 2019-11-21 at 8.08.13 AMWhen I wrote the last two blog posts my husband, Andy, kept telling me to write the third act to give hope to my readers. He is a writer and a theater buff, so he frequently talks about Three Act Structure. Really, he actually does… He says that everything always goes terribly wrong in the second act and that things resolve in the third act. He wants me to hurry up and write part three since the last two posts felt rather tragic and hopeless. I know we’ll get to the third act but, unfortunately, we have a few more obstacles to deal with in act two. 

So let’s recap where we left off. I was on a chemo regiment that worked wonders-briefly. I had a couple of weeks where I felt great, but then the cancer found a way to progress. The result was fluid build-up in my abdomen. So we spent a couple of weeks controlling the symptoms while we worked to chose the best next line of treatment (my fourth). This involved placing the PleurX catheter back in my abdomen so I can get relief at home. Thank goodness, because when they placed the catheter, they removed a whooping 5.1 LITERS from my abdomen. Now that I can control the fluid, it was time to start a new chemo combo, in hopes that the chemo knocks back the cancer again. 

I met with my oncologist, who had a list of three potential treatments. She wanted to research further and consult a colleague before choosing. On Thursday, November 14th, she had decided on Abraxane/Carboplatin, and I was scheduled to start on Tuesday, November 19th. On November 18th, I received phone calls from the hospital’s pre-auth department, our insurance liaison, and my cancer clinic. Since this chemo combo is not part of the standard of care, my insurance company would not approve the drug combination until their medical review board had a chance to review it. On November 20th, the review board came back with their decision. They would not approve the Abraxane/Carboplin combo but recommended a Carboplatin/Gemitadine drug combo. My oncologist now has the option to request a peer-to-peer review with the medical board to fight for her preferred combo or she can accept their choice. She has decided to fight for Abraxane/Carboplatin. 

We are awaiting the decision now. Waiting, in cancer treatment, is the worst part. Waiting for test results, waiting for decisions, waiting for treatment, waiting for relief. Time is precious to a cancer patient. Time off treatment is terrifying. Fear sets in. Is the cancer running rampant while we delay? That’s what it feels like to me. I’m  uncomfortable now and in pain. Will the new treatment turn that around? I have complete trust in my oncologist, and I’m confident that we’ll get on track with a treatment plan again. It’s just that the waiting stinks!! I’d like to get out of act 2 and get on to a resolution! I know my friends and family can’t wait to read Act Three. 

Health Insurance Blues

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I have a love/hate relationship with my health insurance company. It is a necessary evil. Without it, I would be way beyond medical bankruptcy. With it, insurance providers control aspects of my health care that should be between me and my doctors. There’s not much I can do about it. In my invincible 20’s, I thought I didn’t need health insurance. I was living a very healthy lifestyle. I ate well and got plenty of exercise and sleep. I was healthy. I still am healthy, actually, except for this one thing….

As I got older, I realized I needed insurance. Now I know how lucky I am to have good health insurance. I also know the frustrations. Insurance issues are a common problem in my network of cancer patient friends. Chemo and surgery are being delay, or worse, denied by insurance companies. I understand that medical costs dictate some things, but it hurts to see women who can’t get the life-saving treatments they need because insurance companies won’t pay. The added stress dealing with insurance issues and finances is the last thing a cancer patient needs. Stress kills.

Medical costs with a life-long illness are mind boggling. I stopped adding up expenses after my first year of treatment. I left off around $600,000. Since then, I’ve had 4 more surgeries, several scans, tests, and shockingly costly chemo meds. I’m guessing that by now I’m a million dollar baby. Luckily, My insurance has covered most of my medical bills without too many headaches. This makes my current argument more frustrating. 

Last night, I tossed and turned. I was hit with a panic attack. I don’t know who dropped the ball. Somewhere between my cancer center, the pharmacy, and the insurance company, my chemo meds did not arrive on my doorstep in time for me to start my current cycle. My loving husband is much more calm and cool than I am.  He’s better at handling long waits on hold and repeated conversations that go nowhere. He has spent hours on the phone every day this week trying to get my pills for me. For some unexplained reason, the pharmacy claims we had a change of insurance and did not approve my meds. Our insurance company did not change. We did upgrade our plan as of the first of the year with a lower deductible and co-pay (still trying to avoid medical bankruptcy). The pharmacy already sent one round of pills in January, so I don’t know what the issue is. I’m angry because nobody informed me that there may be an issue with my pills. It’s my third cycle of pills, nothing new or unforeseen. 

I was supposed to start taking them on Sunday. Now it’s Wednesday, and I’m still waiting for the hospital to get a pre-authorization for the insurance company. (And my cancer clinic is closed today due to weather). In the overall scheme of things, missing a week of pills should not have a profound effect my health, I’ve been told. That’s hard to wrap my head around, though. I’ve had a rapid, positive response to this new med after only two cycles, and the delay is messing with my head. Friends have said that I’m lucky to get a nice break from side effects. True enough. Side effects suck. But I can’t help but fear that the delay is giving cancer a chance to regain a foothold. This is not something I should have to stress about. If everyone had done their jobs and got my cancer meds to me on time, or at least informed me early enough that there may be a problem so we could have started leaning on them sooner, I wouldn’t have a problem. 

I’ve had a rough seven months dealing with the effects of cancer metastasizing around my lungs and abdomen. The first line of treatment did not work and my symptoms were coming back. By fall my shortness of breath and cough started up again. The fluid around my abdomen worsened, and I had pain and a loss of appetite. Over the holidays, I lost weight that I didn’t want to lose. I was exhausted, and generally feeling ill, weak, and frail. After two rounds with my second line of treatment (the pill I’m currently waiting on), these symptoms started to improve. The cough went away. My gut no longer felt like I had a bowling ball in it. My appetite improved. The meds are working. I want my meds. I want my health.

Maybe I’m just cranky because the windchill is 55 BELOW zero.  

New Car Smell

Imagine you really need a new car. You save your money. You do all the research ahead of time, and find the best dealer. You pick out just the car you need and ask the dealer how much it costs. The dealer tells you that he can’t tell you a cost on the car until after you sign the deal. All the research you do turns up a huge range of prices that the car might cost you, rendering that information useless. Imagine, too, that your “savings” for the car was being held by a company. The company tells you that after you buy the car, they will let you know if they are going to let you have the money for the car. Would you still buy the car?

I’ve been a consumer for quite some time. I always do my research and get my costs upfront in the decision making process. Then I can negotiate and decide whether the cost is worth it. The above scenario sounds absurd, doesn’t it? Most of you would probably walk away from that deal, right? But that is how the scenario plays out in the medical field. There is no transparency in the pricing of medical services. First, patients get the services they need and then deal with the bills (and the insurance companies) after the fact.

Months before my surgery, I was back and forth on the phone between the hospital and my insurance company trying to ensure that this surgery would be covered. Surgery was even delayed while waiting for pre-authorization from the insurance company. I also wanted an estimated cost so I knew what I would be facing if I had to pay a portion of the costs out of my own pocket. I was mostly concerned about the lymph node transfer, which is still seen as “experimental” in the US.

The surgeon himself was confident that the breast reconstruction would be covered. He also told me that the lymph node transfer was most likely to be covered in conjunction with the reconstruction surgery, as opposed to if we did just Lymph Node Transfer. The Women’s Health and Cancer Rights Act of 1998 requires all group health plans that pay for mastectomy to also cover prostheses and reconstructive procedures. I never had any trouble getting coverage for my mastectomy or other reconstructive surgeries, so I was confident my insurance would cover this procedure. I had to trust that all would work out (which is why I pay that huge monthly health insurance premium) and I scheduled the surgery.

However, neither the hospital nor the insurance company would give me an estimated cost of the surgery and hospital stay. Neither would confirm whether the surgery was going to be covered by my insurance or not. I had the hospital tell me the billing codes, but the insurance company still wouldn’t tell me anything until after a claim is submitted. The insurance company pointed me to their online “cost calculator” so I could get an idea of the cost. The range was so large, it was not helpful. The hospital simply said that they would “go to bat for me” if the insurance company denied coverage (after the surgery). This was all the information anyone would give me on cost and coverage before I made the decision to proceed with the surgery.

Hundred Bill CornersBefore the hospital gown hit the bottom of the soiled linens hamper, the ink was dry on the letter from the insurance company. The ink was dry on lines stating “we have determined that the service is not medically necessary,” and “We did not receive any other medical information to make a decision about your admission. We do not have your test results. We do not have reports about your care. You were admitted 01/06/2017. Your admission is not covered.”

The letter was dated 01/09/2017. It was stamped before I was discharged from the hospital, and waiting at my house when I returned home from the hospital. I’ve never seen an insurance company work that fast. It certainly takes longer to process claims and PAY bills. Why would they subject someone to the anxiety and stress of facing medical bankruptcy before they even have all the information from the hospital? I bawled when I read this letter. Truthfully, though, I am not worried (yet.) Once they receive the information from the hospital (and my appeal to their decision to deny me coverage), I feel that they will have to cover this surgery. What frustrates me is the fact that I have to appeal and fight the insurance company. I’m upset that they didn’t wait until all the information was gather from the hospital before sending me a denial. “We do not have results,” “we do not have reports.” Well, GET the results and the reports and THEN tell me what is covered or not covered. I am trying to heal from major surgery. I do not need the added stress.

Thank goodness I’m starting a new career. I may need every penny to pay for this. Who’s buying and selling Real Estate? Call me.

I don’t even like that new car smell.