Cancerversary

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One year ago today, I heard the words, “you have breast cancer”, forever changing my life and challenging my limits over the course of the year. I’ll never forget that day. My time on this planet became more precious that day, and my future became more fragile. Looking back brings a flood of emotion as I recall the experience of that moment in time, now altered by the lens of time and new perspective. I’ll count this year, and every year that passes, as progress towards the goal of so many survivors – stay on the right side of the percentages to become a 5-year survivor, a 10-year survivor, and on and on.

Amongst cancer survivors, this date is known as a Cancerversary. There is some debate regarding which date truly represents a Cancerversary. Some choose the day they were diagnosed. Others choose the day surgery removed the tumor and they became cancer-free. Others count their anniversary as the day they complete all active treatment. For me, there are several dates that will forever stand as milestones on this journey. I mark January 31st as my Cancerversary, the day I learned of my diagnosis, a day I will never forget. I consider February 24th as my Cancer-Free Versary, the day I became cancer free. Other dates also are permanently etched into my mind; the first day of chemo, last day of chemo, end of radiation and active treatment, reconstruction surgery.

The details from that day one year ago are as clear today as they were then. I left the doctor’s office knowing that it was not going to be good news when the doctor called me with the results of the biopsy. Too much about the appointment pointed to bad news. I was there for nearly three hours, getting images and more images; a second look, a third look. The way the doctor shook my hand when he came in the room was the way you shake hands at a funeral, with a deep empathy in his eyes. He held the nurse back from her lunch break so that we could do the biopsy right then and there, rather than scheduling for another day. As we were finishing up, the doctor said, “It doesn’t look good, but I’ve been wrong before”. Not a terribly reassuring statement, I left the appointment knowing what I had already suspected.

I expected the doctor’s call late in the afternoon, so Andy took me out to lunch to pass the time and keep my mind busy with something else. The doctor called earlier than I expected, so I barely heard the words over the din of the lunch crowd. His words confirmed the cancer. I shouldn’t have been shocked, I already knew in my gut what the doctor was going to say, but actually hearing it verbalized was a tough blow. I was thankful that Andy was there to hug me and reassure me, as he would come to do frequently over the course of the year. On the ride home, another call came in, this time from my primary care physician, with her referral to a breast surgeon, who she swore she would go to had it been her diagnosis. And, thus began the wild ride of tests, surgeries, and cancer treatment that would dominate my life for a year.

One year has passed. So much has changed. Reflecting back on why it seemed to be such a busy year, I started counting up Doctor’s appointment, which then lead me to review medicals bills. Then, for some reason, those credit card commercials with the “Priceless” theme popped into my head, (some things, money can’t buy. For everything else…).

Cancer Treatment = One year, 177 appointments, 3 hospitals, 2 surgeries, chemotherapy, radiation, hormone therapy
Medical Bills = $646,474 and counting (thank God for good health insurance)
Time lost to sickness, side effects, and recovery = 1 year
Being a Cancer Survivor = Priceless