New Car Smell

Imagine you really need a new car. You save your money. You do all the research ahead of time, and find the best dealer. You pick out just the car you need and ask the dealer how much it costs. The dealer tells you that he can’t tell you a cost on the car until after you sign the deal. All the research you do turns up a huge range of prices that the car might cost you, rendering that information useless. Imagine, too, that your “savings” for the car was being held by a company. The company tells you that after you buy the car, they will let you know if they are going to let you have the money for the car. Would you still buy the car?

I’ve been a consumer for quite some time. I always do my research and get my costs upfront in the decision making process. Then I can negotiate and decide whether the cost is worth it. The above scenario sounds absurd, doesn’t it? Most of you would probably walk away from that deal, right? But that is how the scenario plays out in the medical field. There is no transparency in the pricing of medical services. First, patients get the services they need and then deal with the bills (and the insurance companies) after the fact.

Months before my surgery, I was back and forth on the phone between the hospital and my insurance company trying to ensure that this surgery would be covered. Surgery was even delayed while waiting for pre-authorization from the insurance company. I also wanted an estimated cost so I knew what I would be facing if I had to pay a portion of the costs out of my own pocket. I was mostly concerned about the lymph node transfer, which is still seen as “experimental” in the US.

The surgeon himself was confident that the breast reconstruction would be covered. He also told me that the lymph node transfer was most likely to be covered in conjunction with the reconstruction surgery, as opposed to if we did just Lymph Node Transfer. The Women’s Health and Cancer Rights Act of 1998 requires all group health plans that pay for mastectomy to also cover prostheses and reconstructive procedures. I never had any trouble getting coverage for my mastectomy or other reconstructive surgeries, so I was confident my insurance would cover this procedure. I had to trust that all would work out (which is why I pay that huge monthly health insurance premium) and I scheduled the surgery.

However, neither the hospital nor the insurance company would give me an estimated cost of the surgery and hospital stay. Neither would confirm whether the surgery was going to be covered by my insurance or not. I had the hospital tell me the billing codes, but the insurance company still wouldn’t tell me anything until after a claim is submitted. The insurance company pointed me to their online “cost calculator” so I could get an idea of the cost. The range was so large, it was not helpful. The hospital simply said that they would “go to bat for me” if the insurance company denied coverage (after the surgery). This was all the information anyone would give me on cost and coverage before I made the decision to proceed with the surgery.

Hundred Bill CornersBefore the hospital gown hit the bottom of the soiled linens hamper, the ink was dry on the letter from the insurance company. The ink was dry on lines stating “we have determined that the service is not medically necessary,” and “We did not receive any other medical information to make a decision about your admission. We do not have your test results. We do not have reports about your care. You were admitted 01/06/2017. Your admission is not covered.”

The letter was dated 01/09/2017. It was stamped before I was discharged from the hospital, and waiting at my house when I returned home from the hospital. I’ve never seen an insurance company work that fast. It certainly takes longer to process claims and PAY bills. Why would they subject someone to the anxiety and stress of facing medical bankruptcy before they even have all the information from the hospital? I bawled when I read this letter. Truthfully, though, I am not worried (yet.) Once they receive the information from the hospital (and my appeal to their decision to deny me coverage), I feel that they will have to cover this surgery. What frustrates me is the fact that I have to appeal and fight the insurance company. I’m upset that they didn’t wait until all the information was gather from the hospital before sending me a denial. “We do not have results,” “we do not have reports.” Well, GET the results and the reports and THEN tell me what is covered or not covered. I am trying to heal from major surgery. I do not need the added stress.

Thank goodness I’m starting a new career. I may need every penny to pay for this. Who’s buying and selling Real Estate? Call me.

I don’t even like that new car smell.