Bump, Set, Spike, Crash!

So much for my goal of fewer doctor’s appointments in 2015. This week alone, I had six appointments. Next week, I have four. The good news is, the nerve damage in my left arm is healing, and the pain in my knee appears to be subsiding, too. I spent the weekend celebrating my birthday to the extreme, culminating in a great feast and bowling with the family. I mostly watched the bowling, though, due to increasing pain in my right arm. Little did I know, that pain would throw my whole week off.

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The rest of the week, I felt like a volleyball, being bumped, passed and spiked from doctor to doctor, on an emotional rollercoaster. It all started on Tuesday. As I returned to work with my physical therapist, I had a new concern for her. I was having worsening pain in my right arm that felt like axillary web syndrome (cording). I struggled with major cording for the first 6 months after my mastectomy, but hadn’t had a recurrence in months. She took one look at my skin and noticed a hot, red area on my right breast and said it looked like cellulitis, a bacterial skin infection. She didn’t want to work on my cording until a nurse took a look at me, so she called down to my surgical oncologist’s office and accompanied me right then and there to see the nurse. The nurse started asking me if I’d been in a hospital setting or could have been exposed to MRSA. A strange question – as we sat / in / a hospital setting.

The nurse was quite concerned and prescribed a strong course of antibiotics to try and fight the infection. She wanted me to see my medical oncologist right away the next day. After that unexpected detour, I was bounced back up for physical therapy to try to relieve some of the pain I was experiencing. While there, I learned more about how quickly these infections can turn serious, often landing women in the hospital, resulting in emergency surgery to remove the infected implant. I was thankful, and feeling hopeful since we caught it early.

Wednesday, I was sent back to the Vince Lombardi Cancer Center to have blood work done and meet with my medical oncologist. At that visit, I learned that the study drug I was taking was continuing to make my blood cell counts drop, opening me up to infection. She told me to hold off on the drug for a few weeks, to let my counts come back up so my body could fight the infection. She then told me she wanted the plastic surgeon to look me over. So, I called to schedule that visit for the next day.

I always seem to end up in tears in the plastic surgeon’s office. Thursday would be no different. He explained that the dermal fibrosis (damage to my skin) was only going to get worse and would leave me open to infections, which can become serious very quickly. I asked him what we could do about it, and he said, “you’re not going to like my answer to that question”. So I told him not to tell me, but, of course, he did. He said I would need another surgery. He explained two options: Either remove the implant and use an external prosthesis, or undergo a much more involved surgery to take skin, muscle and tissue from my back or abdomen to replace the damaged skin on my chest, requiring two nights in the hospital and another long recovery.

Luckily, Andy was with me at this appointment to ask further questions, because my head was spinning. The LAST thing I wanted was another surgery. We came up with a third option which involves giving the antibiotic a chance to clear up the infection, and letting my blood cell counts improve so that my immunity would be less compromised. The doctor was okay with this option, as long as I really watched closely and got to the hospital at the first sign of infection. Andy, always helpful, volunteered to keep a watchful eye on me…

That was that. Watch and see. Walking to the car, my fear of another surgery hit me, and I collapsed into Andy’s arms. He’s always been there to hold me up when I’ve had weak moments. He hugged me tight, not letting go, and reassured me that we would make it through this, too. I let him drive me home.

It’s a good thing he was driving, because I was lost in thought and teary-eyed, looking down at my phone when Andy yelled, “Oh Sh*t” and hit the brakes. That jolted me out of my preoccupation and I glanced up to see two cars racing up the on-ramp, parallel with us. One of the cars lost control and went airborne. It appeared that he was flying through the air right into our path, but thankfully, the wall between the highway and the on-ramp halted his flight, as he crashed explosively into it right next to us. I am thankful that wall kept us out of the crash. The crash did, however, snap me out of worrying about my health, temporarily.

I had a long night second guessing everything. Did I choose the right reconstruction surgery for me? Should I have waited longer to heal from radiation? Did the study drug compromise my immunity so much that I would have to have another surgery? What can I do now to avoid surgery? Slowly, the answers to these question will work themselves out.

Now it is Friday, and I have come full circle, back to my physical therapist. She reassured me that my skin was actually in pretty good shape and the infection seemed to be under control. She thought that I would get past this bump in the road without requiring surgery. I hope she is right, because I have a lot of things I want to do this year, and none of them include room for more slow, painful recovery.

One thought on “Bump, Set, Spike, Crash!

  1. Yowzers. What a lot to take in. I’m really pleased for you that the infection is under control – well done you for pushing for the third option. It’s such a lot to deal with and you do so with such grace and humour! Keep it up. Good luck on the antibotics, I’m on them too and I HATE them. Peace and positive thoughts, Chloe

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