Neurology, Rheumatology, Oncology and Plastic Surgery

I have said this over and over, yet, as much as I strive to have all things cancer behind me (along with 2014), I am learning that the end is NOT the end. I still have broken pieces to put back together and it will take some work to return to my new normal. I made a good effort to complete everything before the new year, and (let’s be honest) new deductible.

On December 23rd, I had the follow-up with the orthopedic surgeon to hear the results of the MRI on my knee. That frustrating appointment left me with no reason for the sharp pain in my left knee that I’ve been dealing with for 4 months, and, frankly, the surgeon treated me like I was nuts. The MRI, x-rays and exams all show that my knee is structurally in good condition. I guess that is good news- I won’t be facing knee surgery. But the bad news is, the pain is debilitating, and there appears to be no cause, thus, no solution. The next step is to see a rheumatologist to try to discover a cause.

On December 30th, I managed to squeeze in 3 more appointments, scattered all over town. Luckily, my boyfriend accompanied me, so the full day with doctors wasn’t as dull as it might have been. First, I met with a neurologist to find out what caused my arm to go numb and weak after surgery. The surgeon and anesthesiologist had told me that most of these types of nerve problems are caused by poor positioning during surgery, which stresses, or overextends the nerve. They said most instances will resolve after 2 weeks. It has now been 3 weeks and, though there is some improvement, my arm is still numb and very weak. The neurologist scheduled me for an EMG test, which is done to find the cause of nerve problems, along with physical therapy to work on strengthening the muscles.

Next was the plastic surgeon. I was healing fairly well after another difficult surgery. The hardest part was the unanticipated nerve damage to my left arm, the psychological impact that was having on me, along with my general disappointment with the end results of the surgery. My skin was in a really delicate state due to radiation. Also, my pectoralis muscles on the radiated side were showing signs of radiation fibrosis, which is the abnormal production of the protein, fibrin, which accumulates in and damages the radiated tissue. The damage to the muscle is making the muscle very tight, limiting my movements and also deforming the shape of my breast. The surgeon again reassured me that I still needed time to heal, and that things would look better as inflammation goes down.

The final appointment was back to the Vince Lombardi Cancer Clinic to have lab work completed in order to get back in the clinical trial and on the study drug again. I was nervous about having blood drawn in my arm now that I no longer had a port, because I still wasn’t convinced that the IV didn’t contribute to the nerve damage in my arm, and I also fear the risk of lymphedema. As usual, though, my fear was worse than the reality and the blood draw went smoothly. My numbers had returned to normal, so they sent me on my way to continue with the pills, only at a lower dosage to prevent it from effecting my blood cell counts.

I think my New Year’s Resolution is going to be less doctor’s appointments in 2015.

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